Varicose Vein Surgery Risks

Vein Clinic: Varicose Veins | Department of Surgery

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why do I have varicose veins?
    I am 25 years old, I'm skinny and I never been pregnant. I am active and keep a healthy diet. I work out an hour a day plus I take my dog on 3-4 walks a day. I don't keep my legs crossed and I wear compressed socks.

    I started getting varicose veins when I was 14. I've always been skinny and so is my family. Varicose veins do not run in my family. My family is pretty healthy. Both sets of grandparents are still alive and disease free. My veins have never hurt but I started getting bad purple, rope like veins that are extremely obvious and unattractive. The older I get, the more I get.

    I have talked to a vein specialist and I've been told my varicose veins are not threatening and they are not affecting my health at all. I do not feel any pain but I did get a laser treatment for my veins when I was 23. They told me my insurance was going to cover it in full, so I got it done. However, it was just a cosmetic procedure and they told me my legs will look a lot better, because I have these veins all over my legs and they look hideous. People comment on them all the time, and I don't wear shorts or skirts in the summer. I got the surgery and was told my legs will look stunning after a couple weeks. But the surgery did not work and I am getting more and more veins popping up. My legs are almost covered in these veins and they are getting worse. Not only did the surgery not work, but my insurance didn't cover it but I was told they would cover it in full. I later got billed for ,000. I have since gone back to the doctor and my legs now look like a 90 year old woman's legs. All the doctor could say is that I have no health risks and they don't wanna do the surgery again since it never worked the first time. I was told that is rare for it to not work and the doctor told me I'm a rare case. I look online for laser vein surgery and it apparently works for everyone. I don't know what to do now. I understand I'm not in a health risk but I don't want my legs to look this way anymore. I can't even wear a dress, even with nylons. Everyone can see blue and purple veins through nylons. If people ever see my legs, they are so fascinated by how veiny I am. People comment how it looks sick and it must be painful for me, but it's not. If I wanna scare a little kid, I just show my legs. How can I get normal looking legs and why am I going through this since none of the causes of varicose veins are affecting me at all?

    • ANSWER:
      plastic surgery?

      i'm sorry hun i have bad veins too. :(

  2. QUESTION:
    Varicose veins, Any Doctors Able To Answer?
    My Mom Has varicose veins, im trying to look up some kind of treatment for her. im aware that there are both surgical and non-surgical procedures available (EVLT getting my attention). from what i have read of EVLT im assuming that it closes the veins, and i was just wondering if surgically removing them would be better or is evlt more effective/safer? is it okay to keep dead veins in your leg/will it interfere with the flowing veins/ are there any risks in surgery or EVLT. i just need like overall explaination cause like i said i dont know anything about it thank you very much. Merry christmas

    • ANSWER:
      The "best" method for your mom depends on :
      1) the surgeon's experience &
      2) the layout of her veins.

      Surgical removal (ligation & stripping) completely removes the vein. No chance of return. Methods of ablation (laser & radio) cause the vein to scar down. Minimal chance of return.

      Leaving the vein doesn't cause a problem.

      If given the choice, I'd opt for ablation. Less pain, up quicker.
      In the hands of a skilled vascular surgeon, both are eaually safe.

      Most insurance requires a period of conservative treatment (rest, elevation, compression, use of meds like motrin, aleve, etc, and ice). This can vary from 6 weeks to 6 months.

  3. QUESTION:
    My mommy is having surgery and im really really scared bout it...?
    This coming friday my mommy is going to be having surgery on her legs. To have her varicose veins taken out because they r really really bad. Im really scared bout it because she told me that if something would go wrong she could die. What r the risks that could happen with this surgery? and Is my mommy gonna be able to walk around and stuff?

    • ANSWER:
      Every surgery involves a certain amount of risk. Mainly involving reactions to anaesthetic. The surgery your Mums is having is very low risk. Worrying won't help anyway, okay? My Mum has had this operation three times. Your Ma will be a little bit tender in the following week or so, so make sure you make her lots of cups of tea, and keep her comfy.

      She won't be able to run around straight away, but in the long run, she will be in less pain and discomfort from her legs, so she'll be able to do heaps more on her legs than before the operation.

      Varicose veins are very painful, they're hot, they itch and drive you bonkers. Your Mum will be heaps happier after. Don't worry.

  4. QUESTION:
    Should my mother choose local anesthesia or general anesthesia ?? URGENT HELP?
    my mother who suffer from varicose veins
    is going to have surgery to remove them (and the small ones are going to be treated with laser)
    she met the surgeon to day and he said he wanted to do 2 surgeries (2 hr each ) with general Anesthesia
    or she have an option if she wants to have local anesthesia,but her said with local he cant do it for more than 45 min each (or more with local can be dangerous ?)
    my mother says she is leaning to general
    but i want her to have local because she is overweight and have asthma and i know with general there are higher risks for complications
    thanks
    i would love an anesthesiologist also to answer mine
    my mother is around 15kg overweight
    and her asthma (when she have them) are bad but when most of the days she dont use medication and sometimes she will use a purple round inhaler for a while(sometimes months)
    also the surgery must be done on both legs
    which will be safer ? there is a big vein in her leg that need to be taken out will 45 min be enough ? the docotr did mention that option after all
    also which way will have less risk ? my mother want general so she can be done with it faster (less surgeries) because with local she may need there
    the doctor said with local he can only give her one injection at time and work for shorter time

    • ANSWER:
      You have all the alternatives, and you are correct. It is a question of risk versus benefit, which only your mother can answer. She can consult the anesthesiologist directly. It also depends on how much overweight she is, and how frequently she has asthma attacks. She is permitted to take her asthma medications just before the surgery. The anesthesiologist has much more experience of patients than the surgeon, since that is all he/she does every day.

  5. QUESTION:
    what will happen if my husband its positive for varicocele?
    he did the test already we going to see the results on march 28 but im scared if he has to do surgery to removed it cause he drinks pills for his epilepsy seizure what can I do to calm down I cant stop thinking and fearing about the results.
    varicocele:A varicocele is a widening of the veins along the cord that holds up a man's testicles.
    Causes, incidence, and risk factors

    A varicocele forms when valves inside the veins along the spermatic cord prevent blood from flowing properly. This causes the blood to back up, leading to swelling and widening of the veins. (This is essentially the same process that leads to varicose veins, which are common in the legs.)

    Varicoceles usually develop slowly. They are more common in men ages 15 - 25 and are most often seen on the left side of the scrotum. Varicoceles are often the cause of infertility in men.

    The sudden appearance of a varicocele in an older man may be caused by a kidney tumor, which can block blood flow to a vein. This is more common on the left side than the right.
    Symptoms

    *

    Enlarged, twisted veins in the scrotum
    *

    Infertility
    *

    Painless testicle lump, scrotal swelling, or bulge within the scrotum

    There may not be symptoms.
    Signs and tests

    The health care provider will examine the groin area, including the scrotum and testicles. The doctor may be able to feel a nontender, twisted mass along the spermatic cord. (It feels like a bag of worms.)

    However, the mass may not be able to be seen or felt, especially when lying down.

    The testicle on the side of the varicocele may be smaller than the one on the other side.
    Treatment

    A scrotal support (jock strap) or snug underwear may provide some relief of the pain or discomfort. If pain continues or other symptoms occur, further treatment may be needed.

    Surgery to correct a varicocele is called a varicocelectomy. The surgery is usually done on an outpatient basis. You will receive some type of numbing medication (anesthesia). The urologist will make a cut, usually in the lower abdomen, and tie off the abnormal vein. Blood will now flow around the area into normal veins. Keep an ice pack on the area for the first 24 hours after surgery to reduce swelling.

    An alternative to surgery is varicocele embolization. This method is also done on an outpatient basis. However, it uses a much smaller cut than surgery, so you heal faster. A small hollow tube called a catheter (tube) is placed into a vein in your groin or neck area.

    Using x-rays as a guide, the health care provider moves the tube into the varicocele. A tiny coil passes through the tube into the varicocele. The coil blocks blood flow to the bad vein, and sends it to normal veins.

    After the procedures, you will be told to place ice on the area and wear a scrotal support for a little while. Complications from treatment may include:

    *

    Atrophic testis
    *

    Blood clot formation
    *

    Infection
    *

    Injury to the scrotal tissue or nearby blood vessel

    • ANSWER: