Varicose Veins In Groin Area

If you are at risk for developing varicose veins, you need to educate yourself on what you can to do to avoid them. Not only are they very unattractive, varicose veins can cause ulcers of the lower legs which can lead to infections. So read on to discover ways that you can avoid varicose veins.

Varicose veins are large purple looking veins that develop mainly in the legs, more specifically in the calf area of the leg. They will look like huge cords or ropes and protrude significantly from the skin. These protruding veins can become very painful and some may develop into ulcers that will be very hard to heal.

So what measures can you take to avoid developing varicose veins?

First of all, get plenty of exercise. Walking and other types of activities can increase the blood flow in your legs to keep the blood from pooling in the veins.

Be very careful to watch your weight and watch what you eat. Obesity will produce added pressure on your legs which can contribute to varicose veins. Eating a poor diet that makes you retain water can add to the problem also. Keep your weight under control and eat a healthy diet with plenty of low salt food and fruits and vegetables.

Try to keep from sitting or standing for long periods of time. You should make it a point to change positions every 30 minutes or so to improve blood flow. If possible, take a short walk or break every 30 minutes to stimulate blood flow throughout your body. If you sit a lot, try to avoid crossing your legs. While this may be very comfortable for you, it will interrupt the blood flow in your legs.

Take note of what you are wearing. High heels do not work the calf muscles like low heels do. Avoid wearing tight fitting clothes around your waist and groin areas. This can cut off the circulation to the lower body and increase your risk for varicose veins.

Elevate you legs several times a day. If possible, lie down on the floor and place several pillows under your legs to elevate them above your heart. This will improve your venous circulation and increase the blood flow in your legs.

You may want to purchase a pair of compression stockings to wear if you are in a job that requires you being on your feet all day. These stockings will steadily squeeze your legs all day, therefore increasing blood flow throughout your legs. These stockings can be purchased at your local pharmacy or your doctor can write you a prescription for compression stockings. Just be sure to get the ones that fit you properly. If you require help, ask someone in the pharmacy to help you with your choice. Compression socks for both men and women are also available if you prefer to wear socks.

So there you have several ways to reduce your risk for developing varicose veins. Use these preventive measures and you may never have to worry about varicose veins!

About the author: For more tips and information about varicose veins and available treatment options please visit Can You Get Rid Of Varicose Veins Without Surgery? please visit: http://www.squidoo.com/varicose-vein-treatment

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/how-to-prevent-varicose-veins-433777.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have a huge varicose vein in my groin area and am 8 months pregnant. Will it go back to normal after baby?

    • ANSWER:
      I always got huge spider web looking varisoce viens on my inner knee when i was pregnant. After my first two pregnancies it went away after the baby was born but after my third was born it just faded a lot but is still there. It depends, everyone is different.

  2. QUESTION:
    im young with varicose veins - dangerous?
    I am 23 and have had varicose veins since I was 16 years old. I have always been top heavy (3 stones overweigt) and apparantly that can be one of the reasons why I have them. It runs from just under my groin area all the way to the side of my knee bone and is completely painless, just unsightly. I have lost a couple of stones and they are less visible as a result but I want to know whether they are dangerous or are linked to anything else that may cause me problems in later life. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I agree that these need to be looked at before they do become a problem and painful. Here is a link that tells the basics. Best wishes
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/varicoseveins.html

  3. QUESTION:
    Is the Varicose Veins surgery safe? Should I do it?
    Hello,
    I was born with varicose veins on my legs. I have been living with them whole life and i mostly don't have pain. Sometime i feel some discomfort, but this happens 1,2 times a year. I went to the doctor and after 1 year of fighting with the insurance company I got the YES from them to do the surgery. Now because I know, i can do it, i got scared and i am not sure if I am doing the right thing. I know doctors say do it, but trusting the doctor is not an easy thing. I am 34 years old and the only reason for the surgery is to make sure that i wont have complications when i get older. And I have heard that the sooner the better. Later when body gets older this cannot be done. Again, I don't care how my legs look like. Is there anyone there who had such surgery and what are your opinions and experience with it. My doctor said that part of the veins will be removed by the laser, by killing the main valve close to the groin area. Rest will be removed (those below the calves) by cutting small holes in the skin and removing the veins.
    Please advice. Should I do it? What are your experiences?
    I am not sure how is it called, but i know that one step is to close the vain either with laser or smth else and because the veins below the knee are very uneven they said the must cut in many places and then remove them.
    DrThomas, i was told by people who are supposed to do that the vains at below my knees are so rounded that they cannot be removed without many cuts and then removing them? Does it sound like they dont know what they doing?
    Also does anyone knows who is the best for that type of sugery in Chicago illinois?

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    varocosities ... Vulva varicose veins in pregnancy.?
    Hi has anyone ever had problems with varicose veins in the vulva area while pregnant? The reason i ask is because i think this is what i have. Im 29 weeks pregnant and my baby girl who im naming Anya is all on one side. All to the left side. midwife said this is ok and not unusual for a baby to be all on one side but over the last week ive been getting a lot of pain in the left side of my groin and slight swelling. the only thing search engines are coming up with is varocosities. and i just want to know from other people that may of had this does my symptoms and diognosis sound right and what i can do to help ease the discomfort.

    • ANSWER:
      hi I'm 30 weeks and got the same it the 2nd time iv got it ,warm Barth's and when it swell up it means put you feet up that should reduce the pain that is all i do and don't keep on your feet too much it dose not mean you cant to anything i still walk 4 hours a day 5 day a week but do as much as you can then rest you will know your limits hope this help

  5. QUESTION:
    Fullness and aching in leg groin area every month when I get my period, why?
    It starts just before I get my period and lasts two or three days.It almost feels like my circulation is getting cut off. Changing position does not help. It`s worse when I stand up. It started with my last pregnancy, I had a large varicose vein in the outer lip of my vagina. It hurt terribly, but went away shortly after giving birth. This aching I have now is similar. I am a little overweight (15 lbs) and I get plenty of exercise. Could it be some kind of hernia? Or is it the effect of having six children and standing a lot? It drives me crazy.

    • ANSWER:
      you really should go have it checked out. if nothings found just try to keep your feet up as much as you can during his time.

  6. QUESTION:
    could this be a pregnancy induced varicose vein?
    I am now pregnant with my third child. With my second pregnancy i battled with what i thought was an ingrown hair in my groin area the whole pregnancy. It was a large knot in the crease of my panty becoming very tender when i wore certain panties that aggravated it or stood for a long period of time. After i had my son it went away and never came back until i was 6 weeks pregnant along with my 3rd child. Now I am battling with this thing again, I really have no clue what it could be but know it's pregnancy related, I have been researching alot and the closest thing i found was a varicose vein. Towards the end of my pregnancy it will turn very purple but after the baby i have no problem. Has anyone ever experience this, or varicose veins in pregnancy any opinion/advice would be appreciated. I got to the doc in 3 weeks it's nothing that i feel like i have to be seen asap for but still is aggravating thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Varicose veins are very common at pregnancy, it is the increase of estrogen that makes them 'pop' along with some other pregnancy symptoms.
      There is a lot you can do to treat varicose veins or even prevent them.
      Do exercise, mild sport.
      Do not sit or stand for long time periods.
      wear loose cloth.
      Do not wear high heel shoes.

      Read more prevention methods in the attached website "pregnancy veins"

  7. QUESTION:
    what will happen if my husband its positive for varicocele?
    he did the test already we going to see the results on march 28 but im scared if he has to do surgery to removed it cause he drinks pills for his epilepsy seizure what can I do to calm down I cant stop thinking and fearing about the results.
    varicocele:A varicocele is a widening of the veins along the cord that holds up a man's testicles.
    Causes, incidence, and risk factors

    A varicocele forms when valves inside the veins along the spermatic cord prevent blood from flowing properly. This causes the blood to back up, leading to swelling and widening of the veins. (This is essentially the same process that leads to varicose veins, which are common in the legs.)

    Varicoceles usually develop slowly. They are more common in men ages 15 - 25 and are most often seen on the left side of the scrotum. Varicoceles are often the cause of infertility in men.

    The sudden appearance of a varicocele in an older man may be caused by a kidney tumor, which can block blood flow to a vein. This is more common on the left side than the right.
    Symptoms

    *

    Enlarged, twisted veins in the scrotum
    *

    Infertility
    *

    Painless testicle lump, scrotal swelling, or bulge within the scrotum

    There may not be symptoms.
    Signs and tests

    The health care provider will examine the groin area, including the scrotum and testicles. The doctor may be able to feel a nontender, twisted mass along the spermatic cord. (It feels like a bag of worms.)

    However, the mass may not be able to be seen or felt, especially when lying down.

    The testicle on the side of the varicocele may be smaller than the one on the other side.
    Treatment

    A scrotal support (jock strap) or snug underwear may provide some relief of the pain or discomfort. If pain continues or other symptoms occur, further treatment may be needed.

    Surgery to correct a varicocele is called a varicocelectomy. The surgery is usually done on an outpatient basis. You will receive some type of numbing medication (anesthesia). The urologist will make a cut, usually in the lower abdomen, and tie off the abnormal vein. Blood will now flow around the area into normal veins. Keep an ice pack on the area for the first 24 hours after surgery to reduce swelling.

    An alternative to surgery is varicocele embolization. This method is also done on an outpatient basis. However, it uses a much smaller cut than surgery, so you heal faster. A small hollow tube called a catheter (tube) is placed into a vein in your groin or neck area.

    Using x-rays as a guide, the health care provider moves the tube into the varicocele. A tiny coil passes through the tube into the varicocele. The coil blocks blood flow to the bad vein, and sends it to normal veins.

    After the procedures, you will be told to place ice on the area and wear a scrotal support for a little while. Complications from treatment may include:

    *

    Atrophic testis
    *

    Blood clot formation
    *

    Infection
    *

    Injury to the scrotal tissue or nearby blood vessel

    • ANSWER:
      Varicoceles are pretty common. I don't think they require surgery unless they cause discomfort or pain. The surgery is outpatient, so it's usually not a major procedure to be too worried about.

  8. QUESTION:
    femoral hernia?
    I am about 30 weeks pregnant and have found a small grape-like bump in my groin area accompanied by many large varicose veins. My doctor told me that the bulge was probably vein related. But of course, being over the weekend I can't go anywhere to ask except the ER. I am in a bit of pain and it subsides when I push it inwards. It does disappear for a few seconds and then comes back out again. Should I be concerned or worried or should I wait until Monday? Thank you so much!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I wouldn't wait until Monday. It's always better to be safe than sorry, especially when you are caring for two. You are very far along. Pregnant women sometimes can have problems regarding blood clots in their legs. I really think you should get this checked out immediately.

  9. QUESTION:
    What could this dull ache be in one of my testicles?
    I'm posting this for a friend by the way.
    ________________________________

    So a while ago, after a very heavy session of drinking one morning, I awoke as normal with a strange kind of hangover, my left testicle was very sensitive to the touch and I noticed a aching pain in that area that came and went through the entire day, and next day. It then stopped for a few weeks, and then later came back, but not nearly as severe and painful. ( I am pretty certain nobody kicked me in the balls that night)

    When it came back the 2nd time it was more a dull, pulsating aching pain, which was noticeable but not causing any discomfort, and I could still masturbate and have sex with no problems.

    Since then it's seems to be getting progressively better, however something is still not completely right because some mornings I wake up and, it's not the pain that is there, but my left testicle has retracted and gone up into my groin area, whereas my left one has remained where it usually is.

    I checked myself for any visual enlargement, swelling, lumps, discoloring and found nothing, I had my girlfriend check too and she found nothing.

    I had a really weird dream last night that I had this pain again, and I took some aspirin to in effect "thin the blood" which could help, as I read somewhere on the internet about a condition called Varicose Veins. But i'm not sure.

    Another odd thing is, it seems to always happen the day after i've been drinking, even if it's just one beer that i've had after i've come home from University, or been out and got really drunk... Could it be connected to my kidneys in any way?

    Right now it feels fine, but once in a while i'll have a little "pulsating" for a few seconds, which is noticeable but barely uncomfortable. I get the feeling now that because i'm thinking about it so much, i'm actually possibly just hallucinating that i'm still getting this dull ache. But it does seem to be getting much less noticeable.

    Can anyone suggest anything? I have been contemplating going to see a Dr. but because it seems like the problem is improving rather than getting worse, I thought I would search the internet first to find any possibly solution or answer.
    this has all happened since December 1st 2009, today is 25th January 2010, so just over a month and a half.

    • ANSWER:
      Your problem can be as simple as the pants you wear, to the way you sit when your drinking.
      The fact that it goes away means that your body does heal itself! The fact that it returns after drinking could mean that your kidneys could be involved. Or you may have a slow healing injury.
      Drink alot of water just before and right after you drink alcohol again.
      If hydrating yourself fully does not make a difference then your kidneys are not to blame!
      If you wear tight jeans and sit with your legs open, then you are crushing your balls.
      But one thing is certain, if you find blood in your cum then you need to go see a doctor!
      God's Speed to you!

  10. QUESTION:
    HELP! What is wrong with me?
    I have discovered a painful, raw, raised area in my groin region. Is it a varicose vein? Is there anything I should be worried about?

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v464/katwat/alex.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      maybe a cyst? people get them all the time, they are usually benign. But either way they have to be taken care of and checked out by a doctor. My sister and my friend have both have one and they were both benign. I don't know if that's what it is, but I have had my fair share of medical fiascos because I wouldn't see a doctor. Please, just get it checked out.

  11. QUESTION:
    Will visible surface veins after DVT go away?
    I was recently in the hospital for deep vein thrombosis. I am missing an inferior venacava so I developed clots in my legs. Im thankful that I am well for the most part now, but Im only 19 so what look like varicose veins on my groin area and legs are somewhat disconcerting. Just curious as to weather or not they will go away over time..Any help would really be appreciated =)

    • ANSWER:
      I dunno about vericose veins, but for surface spider veins ... Avon makes this awesome stuff. I think it is called "refine" It is in a purple tube, and it says specifically for stretch marks and spider veins. I have a big spider vein spot on the back of my leg, and it didn't make it go away, but it made it significnatly lighter. It also truned my stretch marks from bright red to normal skin color. Give it a try. It is inexpensive. You can also get outpatient surgery to fix vericose veins.