Vein Clinic

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Where to begin? Depending on the vein clinic that you choose, a host of possible procedures may be available at facilities around the country. The specific treatment that is recommended to you may depend on the venous condition from which you're suffering. If you are experiencing varicose veins, you may be encouraged to explore certain treatments, while those with spider veins may be encouraged to explore other treatments. To determine which are right for you a consultation with a specialist is likely a worthwhile endeavor.

Sclerotherapy is one of the more commonly used treatments at vein clinics around the country. Through sclerotherapy, patients have successfully overcome spider veins and small varicose veins. This treatment involves the injection of a chemical sclerant that irritates the vessel lining, causing the vein to shrink and collapse so that blood may no longer flow through it. This will cause them to fade away so they are no longer noticeable.

Laser and light therapy is another procedure that may be found at facilities specializing in the treatment of venous conditions. Large varicose veins may be treated using endovenous laser ablation in which a laser fiber is inserted into a problem vein and is used to deliver laser energy to the vein to close it. Radiofrequency ablation procedures may also be used to treat larger varicose veins. These procedures have been successful in providing relief from this condition without the invasive surgery involved in certain stripping or ligation procedures.

There are several other treatment options awaiting individuals seeking relief from venous conditions such as varicose veins and spider veins. Compression stockings may be recommended to patients as a first line treatment before other options are used. With varicose veins, blood becomes pooled in the legs. Compression stockings work by 'milking' blood back up the leg towards the heart. There are various styles of compression stockings available and modern designs have made wearing them in public less of a concern.

Instead of seeking treatment all the time patients may also want to look at prevention methods. For example, people who are overweight, obese or inactive are more prone to get to spider and varicose veins. Quite possibly a Lap band procedure will help you lose the weight as well as the vein condition.

When you're choosing a vein clinic, choose one that offers more than one treatment. This way, depending on your diagnosis, the specialist has several treatments from which to choose to recommend to you. Also be sure to ask questions about the procedure that you're interested in choosing as treatment so that you understand it in detail before treatment is begun. It may also be helpful to inquire about other treatments that may not be available at the clinic.

About the author: Visit the Hollywood Varicose Vein clinic for information on procedures and questions for Dr. Landau on treatment, therapy, on Spider Veins Treatment in Glendale , CA and throughout the Los Angeles area

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/what-procedures-are-performed-at-a-vein-clinic-3542404.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Mississippi Laser Varicose Vein Treatment - Does anyone know any reputable clinics?
    I just recently moved into the Mississippi area from California and was not sure which vein clinic I should go to get Mississippi Laser Varicose Vein Treatment. I want a reputable and pain-free clinic. Does anybody know where I can find a doctor that is experienced as well?

    Thank you so much Kelly

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Kelly,

      Tough to say what clinic is better or more reputable than the other but in terms of doctors I would suggest you use the one that I go to Dr. Manning from Mississippi Vein Institute. I listed their address below if you would like to visit them or make an appointment. I also listed a page on the clinic’s website talking about the doctor, check it out.

      Jeff

  2. QUESTION:
    how can I find out if Vein Clinics of America is an accredited medical location?
    I just am having trouble searching/confirming whether this place can be trusted for a woman 65 years of age and who has bad varicose veins

    • ANSWER:
      Call the clinic and ask. By law, all medical offices must provide you with this information when asked. They must also provide you with information regarding lawsuits against the doctors if asked!

  3. QUESTION:
    Endovenous Laser Vein Ablation in Mississippi – Any clinics you guys would recommend?
    I was looking to get Endovenous Laser Vein Ablation in Mississippi, can anyone suggest a clinic that they think I should visit. I had an issue with a previous attempted surgery, where I had to back out because of the pain. I was looking for painless procedure that can help me avoid my fear of pain. Thank you.

    Alex Pinto

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Alex,

      I understand what you mean laser ablation is very painful is never a pleasant experience. I know one clinic in Mississippi called Mississippi Vein Institute who can help. Their surgeon Dr. Manning is very experienced in painless procedure and has the latest in pain-free surgery. I left a link to their vein procedures that they do in the page below. Maybe you could do another procedure instead that may be more pain-free or cheaper.

      Cheers!

  4. QUESTION:
    My friend, C.A. Pillary told me the doctor was being vein arteries gone back to his clinic?
    "He's a bloody scab", he said, "And I don't like his type at all - he ought to be transfused to another hospital". Do you agree?

    • ANSWER:
      I think he`s a BLEEDIN` CLOT and..... I`m sure he`s having an affair with VENA. (you know the one whose husband is a CORPUSCLE in the army) He aORTA leave her alone before he breaks her HEART or his wife FLOW finds out. I gather he likes to CIRCULATE in high places, and I hear he WOUNDS down by PUMPING iron, and watching his new PLASMA tv that he was CELLed by LOCUMS Lectricals last month.

  5. QUESTION:
    hi i have some large vein on my leg and i want them remove can you help me find a laser website or a clinic.?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had the vein laser treatment on both my legs. One has slightly discolored a few "spots" on upper thigh. Tho nothing major. I guess I can live w/it. I did have a large vein on the backside of one of my legs, and Dr. said it was "too" large.... Laser cannot reduce everything, but it does reduce multiple signs of most all the unsightly little ones. Make sure to request a pain reliever before treatment. I have an extremely high tolerance to pain, and did not take anything the first go. I learned b4 going in for the touch up appt. It just stings! Especially after he continues up and down each leg. Money well spent. Around 0 total for both legs for one appt. Texas area.

  6. QUESTION:
    What doctor ( specialist ) should i go if I have DVT - deep vein thrombosis?
    I'm on coumadin and i go to an anticogulant clinic, but i feel she doesn't really know much about my problem.

    • ANSWER:
      Cardiologist.

  7. QUESTION:
    Varicose, Spider Vein, Really want to get rid of it.?
    Ever since i was 10, i've had a Varicose vein on the side of my nose which i feel, though it is about half the size of a 5p coin, it is unsightly.

    I've always hated it, and two years ago i went to the doctors to see what they could do about it, I was hoping they would suggest lasering it away [which i heard can be done] but instead i was refered to a clinic who prescribed me a make-up cover-up stuff. I didn't think it worked well enough and didn't cover it up so i stopped using it.

    Maybe they suggested make-up rather than the laser treatment because i was only 14 at the time? If i went back now at 16 would they suggest the laser treatment instead?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      What are varicose veins and spider veins?

      Varicose veins are enlarged veins that can be flesh colored, dark purple or blue. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They are swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are commonly found on the backs of the calves or on the inside of the leg. During pregnancy, varicose veins called hemorrhoids can form in the vagina or around the anus.

      Spider veins are similar to varicose veins, but they are smaller. They are often red or blue and are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. They can look like tree branches or spider webs with their short jagged lines. Spider veins can be found on the legs and face. They can cover either a very small or very large area of skin.
      What causes varicose veins and spider veins?

      The heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients to the whole body. Arteries carry blood from the heart towards the body parts. Veins carry oxygen-poor blood from the body back to the heart.

      The squeezing of leg muscles pumps blood back to the heart from the lower body. Veins have valves that act as one-way flaps. These valves prevent the blood from flowing backwards as it moves up the legs. If the one-way valves become weak, blood can leak back into the vein and collect there. This problem is called venous insufficiency. Pooled blood enlarges the vein and it becomes varicose. Spider veins can also be caused by the backup of blood. Hormone changes, inherited factors, and exposure to the sun can also cause spider veins.
      How common are abnormal leg veins?

      About 50 to 55% of American women and 40 to 45% of American men suffer from some form of vein problem. Varicose veins affect 1 out of 2 people age 50 and older.
      Who usually has varicose veins and spider veins?

      Many factors increase a person's chances of developing varicose or spider veins. These include:

      * Increasing Age
      * Having family members with vein problems or being born with weak vein valves
      * Hormonal changes. These occur during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause. Taking birth control pills and other medicines containing estrogen and progesterone also increase the risk of varicose or spider veins
      * Pregnancy. During pregnancy there is a huge increase in the amount of blood in the body. This can cause veins to enlarge. The expanding uterus also puts pressure on the veins. Varicose veins usually improve within 3 months after delivery. A growing number of abnormal veins usually appear with each additional pregnancy
      * Obesity, leg injury, prolonged standing and other things that weaken vein valves
      * Sun exposure, which can cause spider veins on the cheeks or nose of a fair-skinned person

      Why do varicose veins and spider veins usually appear in the legs?

      The force of gravity, the pressure of body weight, and the task of carrying blood from the bottom of the body up to the heart make legs the primary location for varicose and spider veins. Compared with other veins in the body, leg veins have the toughest job of carrying blood back to the heart. They endure the most pressure. This pressure can be stronger than the veins' one-way valves.
      Are varicose veins and spider veins painful or dangerous?

      Spider veins usually do not need medical treatment. But varicose veins usually enlarge and worsen over time. Severe varicose veins can cause health problems. These include:

      * Severe venous insufficiency. This severe pooling of blood in the veins slows the return of blood to the heart. This condition can cause blood clots and severe infections. Blood clots can be very dangerous because they can move from leg veins and travel to the lungs. Blood clots in the lungs are life-threatening because they can block the heart and lungs from functioning.
      * Sores or skin ulcers can occur on skin tissue around varicose veins.
      * Ongoing irritation, swelling and painful rashes of the legs.

      What are the signs of varicose veins?

      Some common symptoms of varicose veins include:

      * Aching pain
      * Easily tired legs
      * Leg heaviness
      * Swelling in the legs
      * Darkening of the skin (in severe cases)
      * Numbness in the legs
      * Itching or irritated rash in the legs

      How can I prevent varicose veins and spider veins?

      Not all varicose and spider veins can be prevented. But some things can reduce your chances of getting new varicose and spider veins. These same things can help ease discomfort from the ones you already have:

      * Wear Sunscreen to protect your skin from the sun and to limit spider veins on the face.
      * Exercise regularly to improve your leg strength, circulation, and vein strength. Focus on exercises that work your legs, such as walking or running.
      * Control your weight to avoid placing too much pressure on your legs.
      * Do not cross your legs when sitting.
      * Elevate your legs when resting as much as possible.
      * Do not stand or sit for long periods of time. If you must stand for a long time, shift your weight from one leg to the other every few minutes. If you must sit for long periods of time, stand up and move around or take a short walk every 30 minutes.
      * Wear elastic support stockings and avoid tight clothing that constricts your waist, groin, or legs.
      * Eat a low-salt diet rich in high-fiber foods. Eating fiber reduces the chances of constipation which can contribute to varicose veins. High fiber foods include fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains, like bran. Eating too much salt can cause you to retain water or swell.

      Should I see a doctor about varicose veins?

      Remember these important questions when deciding whether to see your doctor:

      Has the varicose vein become swollen, red, or very tender or warm to the touch?

      * If yes, see your doctor.
      * If no, are there sores or a rash on the leg or near the ankle with the varicose vein, or do you think there may be circulation problems in your feet?
      o If yes, see your doctor.
      o If no, continue to follow the self-care tips above.

      How are varicose and spider veins treated?

      Besides a physical exam, your doctor can take x-rays or ultrasound pictures of the vein to find the cause and severity of the problem. You may want to speak with a doctor who specializes in vein diseases or phlebology. Talk to your doctor about what treatment options are best for your condition and lifestyle. Not all cases of varicose veins are the same.

      Some available treatments include:
      Sclerotherapy

      This is the most common treatment for both spider veins and varicose veins. The doctor injects a solution into the vein that causes the vein walls to swell, stick together, and seal shut. This stops the flow of blood and the vein turns into scar tissue. In a few weeks, the vein should fade. The same vein may need to be treated more than once.

      This treatment is very effective if done the right way. Most patients can expect a 50% to 90% improvement. Microsclerotherapy uses special solutions and injection techniques that increase the success rate for removal of spider veins. Sclerotherapy does not require anesthesia, and can be done in the doctor's office.

      Possible side effects include:

      * Temporary stinging or painful cramps where the injection was made
      * Temporary red raised patches of skin where the injection was made
      * Temporary small skin sores where the injection was made
      * Temporary bruises where the injection was made
      * Spots around the treated vein that usually disappear
      * Brown lines around the treated vein that usually disappear
      * Groups of fine red blood vessels around the treated vein that usually disappear

      The treated vein can also become inflamed or develop lumps of clotted blood. This is not dangerous. Applying heat and taking aspirin or antibiotics can relieve inflammation. Lumps of coagulated blood can be drained.
      Laser surgery

      New technology in laser treatments can effectively treat spider veins in the legs. Laser surgery sends very strong bursts of light onto the vein. This can makes the vein slowly fade and disappear. Lasers are very direct and accurate. So the proper laser controlled by a skilled doctor will usually only damage the area being treated. Most skin types and colors can be safely treated with lasers.

      Laser surgery is more appealing to some patients because it does not use needles or incisions. Still, when the laser hits the skin, the patient feels a heat sensation that can be quite painful. Cooling helps reduce the pain. Laser treatments last for 15 to 20 minutes. Depending on the severity of the veins, two to five treatments are generally needed to remove spider veins in the legs. Patients can return to normal activity right after treatment, just as with sclerotherapy. For spider veins larger than 3 mm, laser therapy is not very practical.

      Possible side effects of laser surgery include:

      * Redness or swelling of the skin right after the treatment that disappears within a few days.
      * Discolored skin that will disappear within one to two months.
      * Rarely burns and scars result from poorly performed laser surgery.
      Endovenous Techniques (radiofrequency and laser) – These methods for treating the deeper varicose veins of the legs (the saphenous veins) have been a huge breakthrough. They have replaced surgery for the vast majority of patients with severe varicose veins. This technique is not very invasive and can be done in a doctor’s office.

      The doctor puts a very small tube called a catheter into the vein. Once inside, the catheter sends out radiofrequency or laser energy that shrinks and seals the vein wall. Healthy veins around the closed vein restore the normal flow of blood. As this happens, symptoms from the varicose vein improve. Veins on the surface of the skin that are connected to the treated varicose vein will also usually shrink after treatment. When needed, these connected varicose veins can be treated with sclerotherapy or other techniques.

      Possible side effect is slight bruising.
      Endovenous Techniques (radiofrequency
      and laser)

      These methods for treating the deeper varicose veins of the legs (the saphenous veins) have been a huge breakthrough. They have replaced surgery for the vast majority of patients with severe varicose veins. This technique is not very invasive and can be done in a doctor’s office.

      The doctor puts a very small tube called a catheter into the vein. Once inside, the catheter sends out radiofrequency or laser energy that shrinks and seals the vein wall. Healthy veins around the closed vein restore the normal f low of blood. As this happens, symptoms from the varicose vein improve. Veins on the surface of the skin that are connected to the treated varicose vein will also usually shrink after treatment. When needed, these connected varicose veins can be treated with sclerotherapy or other techniques.

      Possible side effects:
      ● Slight bruising.
      Surgery

      Surgery is used mostly to treat very large varicose veins. Types of surgery for varicose veins include:

      Surgical Ligation and Stripping - With this treatment, problematic veins are tied shut and completely removed from the leg. Removing the veins does not affect the circulation of blood in the leg. Veins deeper in the leg take care of the larger volumes of blood. Most varicose veins removed by surgery are surface veins and collect blood only from the skin. This surgery requires either local or general anesthesia and must be done in an operating room on an outpatient basis.

      Possible side effects: Serious side effects or problems from this surgery are uncommon.

      * With general anesthesia, a risk of heart and breathing problems.
      * Bleeding and congestion of blood can be a problem. But the collected blood usually settles on its own and does not require any further treatment.
      * Wound infection, inflammation, swelling and redness.
      * Permanent scars.
      * Damage of nerve tissue around the treated vein. It is hard to avoid harming small nerve branches when veins are removed. This damage can cause numbness, burning, or a change in sensation around the surgical scar.
      * A deep vein blood clot. These clots can travel to the lungs and heart. Injections of heparin, a medicine that reduces blood clotting reduce the chance of these dangerous blood clots. But, heparin also can increase the normal amount of bleeding and bruising after surgery.
      * Significant pain in the leg and recovery time of one to four weeks depending on the extent of surgery is typical after surgery.

      Ambulatory Phlebectomy – With this surgery, a special light source marks the location of the vein. Tiny cuts are made in the skin, and surgical hooks pull the vein out of the leg. This surgery requires local or regional anesthesia. The vein usually is removed in one treatment. Very large varicose veins can be removed with this treatment while leaving only very small scars. Patients can return to normal activity the day after treatment.

      Possible Side Effects:

      * Slight bruising
      * Temporary numbness

      Endoscopic vein surgery – With this surgery, a small video camera is used to see inside the veins. Then varicose veins are removed through small cuts. People who have this surgery must have some kind of anesthesia including epidural, spinal, or general anesthesia. Patients can return to normal activity within a few weeks.
      Can varicose and spider veins return even after treatment?

      Current treatments for varicose veins and spider veins have very high success rates compared to traditional surgical treatments. Over a period of years, however, more abnormal veins can develop. The major reason for this is that there is no cure for weak vein valves. So with time, pressure gradually builds up in the leg veins. Ultrasound can be used to keep track of how badly the valves are leaking (venous insufficiency). Ongoing treatment can help keep this problem under control.

      The single most important thing a person can do to slow down the development of new varicose veins is to wear graduated compression support stockings as much as possible during the day.
      For More Information...

      Contact the National Women’s Health Information Center (NWHIC) at 1-800-994-9662 or the following organizations:

      National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
      NHLBI Information Center
      1-800-575-WELL (9355)
      Internet Address: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov

      American Academy of Dermatology
      847-330-0230
      1-888-462-DERM (3376)
      Internet Address: http://www.aad.org

      American Society for Dermatologic Surgery
      847-330-9830
      Internet Address: http://www.asds-net.org/

      The American College of Phlebology
      510-832-7300
      Internet Address: http://www.phlebology.org/

      This FAQ was reviewed by:

      Margaret A. Weiss, M.D.
      Assistant Professor of Dermatology
      The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
      Baltimore, MD

  8. QUESTION:
    Question about deep vein thrombosis and leg swelling (on the pill)?
    Hi, I have recently been put on the pill, and deep vein thrombosis could be one of the side effects of it.
    My doctor told me to go back to the clinic if my leg swells up, but my question is, if your leg does swell up, does it return back to it's original form? or will there always be evidence that it happened?

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      The swelling is usually fairly minimal and settles once the clot has been dealt with.

  9. QUESTION:
    do any medial people know wht the name of the organ or vein tht controls ejaculation is called?
    had epedidymitis took antibitoics which helped but everytime i ejaculate there is a pain in my left groin area that seems to come from organ that actually pushes the ejaculate out it can hurt for days after one time ejaculateing but what is this oragan or muscle called and why does it hurt like throbbing pain after i ejaculate? the only thin that helps is tons of ibufrofen and the docs i can afford to see are quacks..(free clinic..pa's) i have taken antibiotcs for about 4 weeks and although the pain is better i everytime i ejaculate( once a week) it hurts... its so infrequent that i do ejaculate only because of the pain tht follows? any medical people wiht a clue id sure appreciate it..ty This is ruuning any hope at a sex life for me im 38 and helathy in every other way.

    • ANSWER:
      The Prostate is the gland in you body that holds the semen... the sperm is held in you "balls", and there is a gland in you brain "Pitutary Gland" that creates the stymlus.

  10. QUESTION:
    Could sclerotherapy have triggered a varicose vein?
    Hello, i underwent the above procedure on Saturday for a few small thread veins on my thigh to get my legs summer ready. I did everything that the nurse, who was lovely, said and brought my support tights with me, and have been wearing them since.

    Today, I took my tights off to have a look and noticed quite a lot of swelling in a particular area where i had a more noticable vein (on the side of my thigh, just down towards my knee) I wasn't bothered at all as i know that this is expected. however, I took them off this morning again for a shower and noticed that, about 2 inches above my knee, there appeared to be, what i can only describe as the beginnings of a varicose vein! So i got all the mirrors in my house down to check and thats all i can describe it as! The bulgy vein seems to eminate from the bulge where i had the thread vein injected. I called up the clinic who advised me to come in.

    The nurse said that swelling is expected but said the bulgy vein was nothing to do with the sclerotherapy as you do not inject into those veins. She also did not think that the bulge and the, assumed, varicose vein, where near enough meaning that it could be the start of a varicose vein!!

    I can't belive it :( This has literally appeared since i had the treatment and i am devasted at the prospect of having a bulgy varicose vein!!

    Does this sould like a post-sclerotherapy reaction?

    could the sclerotherapy have caused a varicose vein??

    :(

    • ANSWER:
      varicose vein is caused by going through a pregnancy, standing for long periods of time, being overweight, age(they appear more often as people grow older)

  11. QUESTION:
    if you go to a clinic for 18+ treatment do you need ID?
    im 16 and want to go to a clinic to get rid of spider veins on my legs, i look older but im wondering if they would make me bring id?

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    The doctor missed my vein?
    So I went into a local walk in clinic because I was feeling sick.
    The doctor ruled it out to be a sinus infection. He suggested I get a steroid shot in my butt. He came in with the needle and told me he can do it in my butt or in my vein on my arm. I choose the vein cause he said it wouldn't hurt as much. The doctor goes to put it in... he misses the vein, causing intense pain for me. I saw a patch of skin bubble up. He removed it and I started getting nauseous. I then threw up and the nausea went away. Will I be ok?

    • ANSWER:

  13. QUESTION:
    Drawing Blood at Clinic Question?
    Please help. I have just a few questions. A week ago I went to get tested at a clinic. I saw the nurse take out the new needle, from the capped plastic container. I saw her get a blood collection tube, it had a red mark on the side (later I saw that they all had it). Only I dont remember if I saw if there was anyone elses blood inside the blood collection container. She used the vacutainer holder, vacutainer needle, and vacutainer collection tubes. So here are my questions

    (please, I know theyre not supposed and 'dont' reuse the collection tubes, but i'm interested more in the science of it.that it cant happen anyways...)

    1. I have been told that the blood collection tubes have a vacuum inside, if the tube had been used previously, with someone elses blood inside, wouldnt this make the vacuum process unable to happen and my blood unable to draw? My blood filled the tube.

    2. Technically this be puncturing the rubber cap TWICE. Is the vacuum done after one puncture, and removing the first needle. For example, if she used someone elses needle first on the same tube, removed that needle, isnt the vacuum done after the needle is removed?

    3. I've been told with the negative pressure in the suction/vacuum, theres NO backflow of blood whatsoever up the needle into my own vein. Correct?

    4. The needle (which was clean) is technically the only thing that comes in contact with my bloodstream. Correct?

    5. My test was negative, after a 40 minute rapid test. If there was someone elses blood mixed in with mine, wouldn't that have made it at least indertiminable?

    6. The clinic called me while I was there? (15 mins after) I didnt answer in time (after 17s). It was crowded that day, they left no voicemsg. I assume they were just calling to tell me my test results would be right up. They were in about 15 mins. Sound odd?

    • ANSWER:
      1) Correct, tubes have a vacuum.
      2) The vacuum would only be done when something filled the tube, either blood or air. Puncturing the top does not directly break the vacuum, as the top is rubber and self-seals.
      3) Correct. Even once full, the pressure is equalized and blood doesn't move within the needle system anymore.
      4) Correct.
      5) Not necessarily..what if their blood was negative also?
      6) How do you know that's actually what they were calling about? But not necessarily. Lab tests are very fast once processing is started. Typically the delay is waiting to get the sample to the machine, putting it in line behind other samples. The test itself is quick. So if the line for tests was short...

      Also of note is that the tubes contain chemicals, different preservatives and such that do different things for different color tubes. Each tube is different. This is important because it takes a certain amount of blood to mix with the chemicals to have the desired reaction. MEANING...if they had used the tubes before, there wouldn't be a little blood...there would be good bit of blood...at least 1/3-1/2 full. So you (and the nurse) would definitely have noticed.

  14. QUESTION:
    I have a vein that expands and looks like a bubbles bursting out of my neck, I am kind of scared....?
    I looked on the internet and so far I have only found discouraging articles. I have had a vein in my neck, and when i flex it, it has a small bubble burst in it about a half an inch out at the furthest. It was worse when I was young and was showing people all the time. I recently remembered it and noticed it is still there. I know I should probably go to the clinic or something, but I just want to know if someone else has had this, or has any knowledge about it.

    • ANSWER:
      I googled it and got this link.
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/bulging_neck_veins.htm

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to get rid of varicose veins?
    Im in my early twenties and am getting varicose veins and ive tried the creams & they do not work. I though about going to a vericose vein clinic but I went on youtube one day and saw a procedure done on how to sclerose or close up a spider vein. The MD used Thromboject and a small 22 guage needle and injected tiny amounts of the medicine into the vein and it disappeared right in front of him. I went on Canadian drug websites and saw that people can buy this Thromboject online and was thinking that I can do this myself. I am a graduate nursing student so I know how to give injections. I was just wondering if anyone has any opinions about this or any other suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      yup, that sounds similar to sclerotherapy and you are a medical student & know how to inject.
      it's always worth a shot.

  16. QUESTION:
    Are clinic pregnancy test more accurate than home test? PLEASE HELP!?
    I am really confused. I have been pregnant 2x and now I feel that I am pregnant again. My symptoms are enlarge breast, soar breast, veins showing on breast, light cramping, food cravings, lower back pain, headaches and tiredness. I am 10dpo and I went to the clinic this afternoon for a pregnancy test and it came out negative. I was in a meeting this morning and did drink 12oz of water before I tested. My urine was pretty light in the cup, but it still came out negative. The person at the clinic said their test were pretty sensitive. Was it just too early to test or since it was at a clinic is their test pretty accurate compared to a home test. Has anyone every experienced this before? Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      When I was pregnant with my son, I went to the clinic to get a confirmation test, and it came out negative. I had already gotten a positive at home. Their tests are pretty much the same as a home test, if not less accurate.... I suggest clear blue digital. I got a positive five days before my period with this pregnancy... Good Luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    How would I summarize this article help please?
    How Would i summarize this article?
    The Court Confronts a Grievous Injury

    For years, the Bush administration has worked with industry to try to water down the public’s protections by preventing states from enforcing rules and regulations tougher than those required by the federal government.

    It has tried to apply this policy of pre-emption to rules issued by a slew of federal agencies and is now asking the Supreme Court to approve its improper ideological stand when it comes to drug safety

    On Monday, the court heard arguments in the case of a Vermont musician who lost her arm after being injected with an anti-nausea drug. There is no doubt that Diana Levine was badly injured by a drug made by Wyeth. The only question is whether the Supreme Court will uphold her right to sue the company over its failure to adequately warn of a drug’s dangers. Or will it buy the arguments of the industry and the Bush administration that companies like Wyeth should be protected from such lawsuits in state courts if the products that caused the injury met federal regulatory standards?

    The administration wants approval by the Food and Drug Administration to be the final word in these cases, not state laws like Vermont’s that often require the manufacturer to meet a higher standard in warning doctors and patients about potential dangers. The court should rule in favor of Ms. Levine.

    Ms. Levine went to a clinic seeking relief for a migraine headache. She received Demerol for her headache and Wyeth’s Phenergan to combat nausea, both administered by injections into the muscle, which is the preferred route of administration. When the headaches persisted, she returned for more treatment.

    This time, the same medicines were administered by an intravenous “push” technique that is known to be risky — using a needle inserted into a vein. A physician’s assistant mistakenly hit an artery, with catastrophic results. Ms. Levine quickly developed gangrene; her hand and lower arm had to be amputated. She sued the physician’s assistant, the supervising physician and the clinic for malpractice and won an out-of-court settlement, as well she should have.

    Then she sued Wyeth for failing to warn the clinicians to use the much safer “IV drip” technique, in which the drug is injected into a stream of liquid flowing from a hanging bag that already has been safely connected to a vein, making it highly unlikely that the drug will reach an artery. A trial court awarded her .7 million, and the Vermont Supreme Court upheld the verdict. Now Wyeth, supported by the Bush administration, has asked the Supreme Court to reverse the verdict on the grounds that Wyeth complied with federal regulatory requirements.

    We do not buy Wyeth’s argument that it did everything it needed to, or could have done, to warn doctors about the dangers involved in the treatment Ms. Levine received. Wyeth did warn of some dangers of the drug treatment, in words approved by the F.D.A., but the state court was well within its rights to conclude that those warnings were insufficient.

    And that is the greater point. When Congress revised the federal law governing the F.D.A. in 2007, drug companies wanted, but did not get, a provision shielding them from this sort of lawsuit. The drug industry and its administration allies now want the court to ignore the absence of express legal language and grant drug companies immunity based on a phony assertion that state lawsuits improperly usurp federal regulatory authority.

    For the court to broadly endorse the concept of “implied pre-emption” in this case would show disrespect for the considered decisions of Congress and could foreclose injury suits involving not only drugs, but also motor vehicles, household products and other things. The ultimate effect would be to undermine consumer safety.

    Far from usurping the F.D.A.’s power, litigation aimed at holding drug companies liable for problems like those in this case complement the agency’s efforts to protect the public. For many years the F.D.A. welcomed state failure-to-warn suits as reinforcing those efforts; two former commissioners, David Kessler and Donald Kennedy, made that point in a brief in the case.

    Only under President Bush did the agency overrule its top staff members and try to pre-empt such suits. We hope this business-friendly Supreme Court will preserve the consumer protection that state tort actions often provide. Otherwise, the incoming president and Congress will need to pass corrective legislation.

    How would I summarize this article? Im not so sure on what its talking about and how I would analyze it. Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hope someone can help you

  18. QUESTION:
    what would a nurse do at a laser treatment centre?
    AT a clinic that does hair removal, tattoo removal , red veins, brown marks

    why does this job require a nurse to do it?

    • ANSWER:
      To assist the doctor, just like any other place.

  19. QUESTION:
    i am suffering from phlebitis. How 2avoid discoloration of the leg veins+ can it lead to varicose veins?
    Started suffering 3 months ago after nursing my mother who was paralysed. Last year Ihad a lot of injections in both legs to remove insightly tread veins from both legs from a clinic. Is the inflammation of the veins due to infection should I have antibios
    I do a lot of gardening. I have began gogging in short outburst.100 short stride at a time with rest in between and seem to find less pain during the day as a result. is running better than walking or should I be resting my legs instead?

    • ANSWER:
      how would we know this, you were at the doctor for this procedure, why didnt you ask them?

  20. QUESTION:
    How cani find medical job descriptions and rate of pay?
    i dont really wanna give shots or change bloody pads but i want to work with pregnant women like in maternity but no gross stuff. i can get used to shots but no drawing bloodnot b/c of the blood but b/c u cant always find the veins. any ideas and i also want to wear scrubs and do a littloe desk work in the hospital/clinic also...

    • ANSWER:
      Want to wear scrubs? Go buy yourself some scrubs -- you don't have to be in medicine to wear scrubs. On the other hand, if you really want to work in the medical field, you'll just have to learn to deal with blood. End of story.

  21. QUESTION:
    PLAN B: cant swallow pills, had trouble...BUT..?
    i know its LONG but please READ. i need help..

    today i had sex w my bf and we used condoms but we ran out but we were still wanting to, so we did. i know it was very stupid but we immediately went to get the morning after pill (plan b) the thing is ive never been able to swallow pills. my bf was practically yelling at me to swallow it but only cuz he was freaking out but anyways i used soda that had ice in it inorder to trick myslelf that i was only swallowing ice. it took three tries to get it down. our worry is that most of it or some may have dissolved w the soda so when i did swallow it it wasnt the whole pill. the percentage of the pill working at all is 75% so is that now lowered if it had dissolved in my mouth?

    please answer if you have any experience and dont lecture about doing it w out protection. were both 18, he has a great job at a vein clinic and im currently on the hunt so if (knock on wood) i do get pregnant we can support the child we jus dont want it to come tothat
    congrats on your pregancy!!

    and lol yea value sized :)

    and yes he pulled out and im now considering getting on the pill but again, swallowing them is the problem :/
    im leaning toward the RN on this question lol..shes an RN!

    but hes a sweet guy, been w him for 2 years. he was jus worried and afterwards we talked about the yelling and everything is ok w that now

    • ANSWER:
      You got the pill - I wouldn't worry. Even if it dissolved in your mouth - you still got it. Some pills can be taken sublingual (melt under the tongue) - it's absorbed right into the mucous membranes - so I'm sure you got it no matter what. But you might be nauseous with the plan B pills. That is normal too.

  22. QUESTION:
    Food Tastes Funny After a Quadruple Bypass?
    I had a quadruple bypass in March, my legs are still wide opened from where they took the veins out, I am going to the wound clinic for them. Ever since my surgery tho food tastes funny especially dairy products but sometimes meat, sometimes fruit. For about a month after my surgery everything tasted funny, but now there are somethings that do not. Does anybody know why? I would appreciate any help about what is the matter?

    • ANSWER:
      it is probably due to the medications you are taking, slowly you will get over with it.

  23. QUESTION:
    Nurses- any tricks on how to stick an iv everytime?
    I work as a nurse in an infusion clinic. I am getting better by the day at getting my IV's started but need some helpful hints if you have any... there are some nurses who almost never miss or blow a vein but it gets so busy sometimes that there isn't much time for explanation or help. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Please let me know where you work so I can avoid it.

  24. QUESTION:
    Help naming med spa/clinic?
    I would like to try to figure out a name for my clinic. but i do not want the word spa to be included.
    i would like something that includes one or both of the words "aesthetics, med".
    heres what i have so far

    "nu skin"
    "nu skin med aesthetics"
    "skyn"
    "skyn med aesthetics"
    etc;

    i do focus on skin care and aesthetics, and botox injectables and veins

    Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      This site has over 1000 different spa names...perhaps it can be of some inspiration?

      http://www.wahanda.com/spas/a-z

      The list of Medical Spas they have are:
      http://www.wahanda.com/spas/a-z/type/medical-spa

  25. QUESTION:
    GUM clinic appointment tomorrow! Implanon?
    Hi there,
    on Friday past I was diagnosed by my GP as having chlamydia. I was given a once-off dosage of antibiotics to combat the chlamydia and advised to go to my local GUM clinic for further tests for other, possibly more serious, STDs/STIs.
    My appointment is for tomorrow. I know I'll receive some test results back on the day but I'll have to wait for others, will HIV positivity/negativity be one of the ones that I'm likely to have to wait for?
    Really worried since I got tested as positive for chlamydia that I may end up having something much more serious as well.

    I got the implanon bar in mid-March and I've had a really sore lower left arm and the veins seem much more prominent in my wrists and hands than before. Is this a common side effect of the implant and if not could it be something to do with having an STD?

    My eyes have also became unbelievably sore in the past few weeks but nothing seems to actually be wrong with my vision other than the pain making me want to close my eyes often and bright lights/daylight hurting them.

    What's the likelihood that my symptoms could point to an STD rather than being a side effect of the implanon?

    Any help would be appreciated

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    Drawing Blood At HIV/STD Clinic Question
    I tested for HIV at 3 months, test came back negative. But what I was wondering was, at the clinic (in Philadelphia), I saw the nurse open the first syringe package, she tried to draw blood with that and was only able to draw a little, due to the fact I have small veins. After that, she said we're going to use a vaccum device, I must have looked away for a brief moment, but then just like that, very quickly, she pulled out a butterfly needle.. It had a beigh/yellow tubing, butterfly, needle. Maybe I missed it. I asked if it was clean, she informed me, it was and had just opened a new package. (We had quite the language barrier though) I saw no blood on the needle itself, nor do I remember in the tubing. Isn't the tubing normally clear? And do the butterfly needles come already packaged (explains how quickly she had it ready) And if it were reused, wouldn't it be stained with blood anyways, which I would've noticed? She informed they throw all materials away after each test, and I saw her do the same, I'm just curious here, any help be necessary. I've been through a hectic 3 months, and don't want this to linger on my mind any further. So any professional phlebotomists, nurses, doctors, experts, help be appreciated.
    by tube, i mean tube connected from the needle to the vile where blood is being collected.

    • ANSWER:
      As an ex Med Tech, the butterfly does not neccessarily come wrapped in plastic. The working parts are covered by plastic sheaths and are very easy and quick to use. Yes indeed, all phlebotomy equipment is single use, and it would be obvious if it was used previously. You should not worry.

  27. QUESTION:
    Have you ever gone to a Vetco Petco clinic? Bad experiences, good experiences?
    Tonight I took my 7lb chihuahua/dachshund to this clinic for a heartworm test and they could not get blood from him. I watched as they poked him 3-4 times and even SWISHED the needle around in his veins all while he whined and whined with teary/watery eyes. it was horrible. I couldn't take anymore of it....i took my dog and left.

    Anybody else have any not so good experiences with the Vetco clinic?
    My dog was not hyper haha
    And I won't be going there ever again. I'll stick with my vet. At least they show SOME compassion!!

    • ANSWER:
      We are very sorry to hear your experience at one of our VETCO Clinics was not ideal. We certainly do not wish to cause harm or discomfort to any pet or pet owner. Can you tell me which store you visited and the date? I will look into this further.

  28. QUESTION:
    Do I have Deep vein Thrombosis or a blood clot in my chest?
    Hear me out, Lately Ive been having these so called Panic attacks, where I would breathe fast, rapid heartbeat, numbness in upperbody chest pain etc etc. I've went to emergency room many times I got a bad atttack just to get a peace of mind. I've had in total 3 Ekg's done and 2 xray, all came out fine. So far I've been ok, no big attacks, sometimes I feel out of breath and have to put so much focus into my breathing and usually goes away. But the only thing that bothers me is the chest pain. It's like a stabbing/pinching chest pain, very weird worrying pain I can even point out where the pain is(I went to hospital today because of it and came out fine ekg and xray showed nothing wrong, he claims its a muscle strain) but I cant help but to wonder if its possible I may have a blootdclot in my chest. The pain in my chest seems to be the only thing that bothers me. Some say its the anxiety causing it but I cant believe that. Let me hear what you guys think, can blood clots be shown on a ekg/xray? I only ask because I wont be seeing my clinic doctor till friday so I just wanna have a peace of mind. Earlier when the guy put the sticky thing for the ekg on my chest and took it off i got a sudden redness in the area, kinda itchy as well but not really. It's very weird. I'm sorry everyone please bear with me

    • ANSWER:
      Nice and thorough response by the RN, but I have one postscript (which perhaps the RN will append to her future responses!)

      Many questioners with similar chest pain stories here are quite young and as such are good candidates for PCC, Pre-Cordial Catch syndrome. If your chest pain is sharp, most likely at the end of a deep IN-breath ("pleuritic"), not associated with fever or calf pain... then PCC may be your problem.

      Thankfully, it's a very minor problem and it goes away on its own.

      http://tinyurl.com/28ofml

      - MD x30y

  29. QUESTION:
    How would I summarize/analyze this article?
    How Would i summarize this article?
    The Court Confronts a Grievous Injury

    For years, the Bush administration has worked with industry to try to water down the public’s protections by preventing states from enforcing rules and regulations tougher than those required by the federal government.

    It has tried to apply this policy of pre-emption to rules issued by a slew of federal agencies and is now asking the Supreme Court to approve its improper ideological stand when it comes to drug safety

    On Monday, the court heard arguments in the case of a Vermont musician who lost her arm after being injected with an anti-nausea drug. There is no doubt that Diana Levine was badly injured by a drug made by Wyeth. The only question is whether the Supreme Court will uphold her right to sue the company over its failure to adequately warn of a drug’s dangers. Or will it buy the arguments of the industry and the Bush administration that companies like Wyeth should be protected from such lawsuits in state courts if the products that caused the injury met federal regulatory standards?

    The administration wants approval by the Food and Drug Administration to be the final word in these cases, not state laws like Vermont’s that often require the manufacturer to meet a higher standard in warning doctors and patients about potential dangers. The court should rule in favor of Ms. Levine.

    Ms. Levine went to a clinic seeking relief for a migraine headache. She received Demerol for her headache and Wyeth’s Phenergan to combat nausea, both administered by injections into the muscle, which is the preferred route of administration. When the headaches persisted, she returned for more treatment.

    This time, the same medicines were administered by an intravenous “push” technique that is known to be risky — using a needle inserted into a vein. A physician’s assistant mistakenly hit an artery, with catastrophic results. Ms. Levine quickly developed gangrene; her hand and lower arm had to be amputated. She sued the physician’s assistant, the supervising physician and the clinic for malpractice and won an out-of-court settlement, as well she should have.

    Then she sued Wyeth for failing to warn the clinicians to use the much safer “IV drip” technique, in which the drug is injected into a stream of liquid flowing from a hanging bag that already has been safely connected to a vein, making it highly unlikely that the drug will reach an artery. A trial court awarded her .7 million, and the Vermont Supreme Court upheld the verdict. Now Wyeth, supported by the Bush administration, has asked the Supreme Court to reverse the verdict on the grounds that Wyeth complied with federal regulatory requirements.

    We do not buy Wyeth’s argument that it did everything it needed to, or could have done, to warn doctors about the dangers involved in the treatment Ms. Levine received. Wyeth did warn of some dangers of the drug treatment, in words approved by the F.D.A., but the state court was well within its rights to conclude that those warnings were insufficient.

    And that is the greater point. When Congress revised the federal law governing the F.D.A. in 2007, drug companies wanted, but did not get, a provision shielding them from this sort of lawsuit. The drug industry and its administration allies now want the court to ignore the absence of express legal language and grant drug companies immunity based on a phony assertion that state lawsuits improperly usurp federal regulatory authority.

    For the court to broadly endorse the concept of “implied pre-emption” in this case would show disrespect for the considered decisions of Congress and could foreclose injury suits involving not only drugs, but also motor vehicles, household products and other things. The ultimate effect would be to undermine consumer safety.

    Far from usurping the F.D.A.’s power, litigation aimed at holding drug companies liable for problems like those in this case complement the agency’s efforts to protect the public. For many years the F.D.A. welcomed state failure-to-warn suits as reinforcing those efforts; two former commissioners, David Kessler and Donald Kennedy, made that point in a brief in the case.

    Only under President Bush did the agency overrule its top staff members and try to pre-empt such suits. We hope this business-friendly Supreme Court will preserve the consumer protection that state tort actions often provide. Otherwise, the incoming president and Congress will need to pass corrective legislation.

    How would I summarize this article? Im not so sure on what its talking about and how I would analyze it. Please help

    • ANSWER:
      The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Ms. Levine earlier this year. The Supreme Court affirmed the Supreme Court of Vermont holding that federal law did not preempt Ms. Levine's state-law claim that Wyeth's labeling of Phenergan failed to warn of the dangers of its intravenous administration.

      A summary of that Supreme Court decision which will help you with a more detailed answer to your inquiry.

  30. QUESTION:
    Approximately how much does laser ablation of varicose veins cost?
    I need to have the procedure and insurance will not cover it. I know it will, vary, but does anyone have a ballpark figure? (The clinic is not giving me straight answers either.)

    • ANSWER:
      You can easily check your minimal health care rates in internet, for example here - healthquotes.awardspace.info

  31. QUESTION:
    What was used to test for Malaria?
    When I contracted Mlaria in Belize last year, I was tested in a private clinic that used a vacuum like needle to draw blood. This wasn't a conventional hypodermic, it was like a tube that was pressed against my vein, and somehow it drew a blood sample. When I asked my nurse in the UK she didnt really know what I meant, and its a bit hazy now as it was almost a year ago. Does anyone have any idea as to what this device was called and how it works?

    • ANSWER:
      In the US, most blood samples these days are drawn with a Vacutainer device (name brand, with the same from competitiors). The sample tubes are color-coded to delineate whether there's an anticoagulant and if there is which aniticoagulant is in them, and a panel of tests may take four or so tubes of various types for different tests. Malaria specifically doesn't actually need that, since it's often diagnosed on a smear on a microscope slide, but the associated tests are done that way for simplicity and ease of processing with the cell counters and chemistry analyzers in the laboratory. I suspect you may simply have not asked your nurse in a way that she understood, because the things are pretty well ubiquitous.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can a penis really be broken?
    I have a friend who said that her boyfriend "broke" his penis. She said that while he had an erection, his penis somehow got bent (down) and she said that they both heard a "pop." When they looked at his penis, it had a golfball size blue and purple bump. It turns out that he tore the vein in his penis, and the shaft was filling with blood. They went to a free clinic, and a nurse looked at it and said to keep a heating pad on it, and that it would heal with time. My friend said that now, a year later, his penis still hurts every now and then, especially when he is getting "aroused." Does anyone know what he should do?

    • ANSWER:
      Even though there are no actual bones in a boner, it is possible to break one's penis. To understand how this incredibly rare and painful event can occur, we first need to review a little (or not so little) penile anatomy. The shaft of the penis is comprised of two chambers of spongy tissue, the corpora cavernosa, which run along the inside length of the penis. Erections occur when, in response to physical and/or mental triggers, the nerves of the penis signal the surrounding muscles to relax, allowing blood to pour into the corpora cavernosa. A thick membrane surrounding the corpora cavernosa, the tunica albuginea, keeps the blood that is being pumped into those spongy chambers from being able to escape. The result — a stiffer, larger, and more rigid rod. Although your erect penis may feel rock-hard, it is still flesh and blood.

      Penile fractures occur when an erect penis is thrust against a harder, less flexible object. This could happen if someone enthusiastically plunges and pumps his penis into a partner, or a pillow let's say, and misses or "over-runs" the intended opening and instead hits a pubic bone, headboard, or other hard surface. If the object is hard enough, and the erect penis is thrust with enough force, that thick membrane surrounding the corpora cavernosa can tear, causing an audible "cracking" sound, abrupt loss of erection, severe pain and bruising, and a penis that is typically "bent" to one side or the other.

      Penile fractures are a medical emergency and must be evaluated and treated immediately. In severe cases, it is possible to damage the urethra, interfering with urination. Treatment for penile fractures consists of immediate evaluation, and, most often, surgical intervention to repair the tunica albuginea and restore or preserve erectile function and the ability to pass urine. Similar to other fractures, the sooner the broken part is "set," the less likely permanent damage and misshapenness will result.

      Even though many penile fractures can be fixed, it's probably safer and more pleasurable to focus on finesse rather than force when working and playing with an erection.

      Again, broken penises are really hard to come by, so try not to let stories about this highly unlikely occurrence stand in the way of the happiness that your erect penis might bring to you and others.

  33. QUESTION:
    knots on sides outsides of lower legs after running?
    While Im running, I start to feel the outsides of my lower leg start to get super tight and hurt. I cant say that theyre my calves cuz its kind of lower than the calf muscles and its on the out sides of my lower leg. Ive had shin splints and its definitely not those. After I stop, I fellt them and can see these knots sticking out but they eventually go away after a lil while. I showed them to a Dr. once briefly because I worked at a clinic and just got done running and came inside t show him. He just told me they were possibly just the valves in my veins. I dont get it.

    • ANSWER:
      Im a little baffled by the whole valves in the veins things, but if you had left that out i would suggest just doin the hot and cold packs and maybe massaging and stretching. Oh and it might be a good idea to see a doctor cause i have never heard of valves in veins doing that.

  34. QUESTION:
    If my wife is pregnant, shouldn't she get some time off?
    My wife currently works for Vein Clinics of America and they are telling her that she doesn't have to get any time off to have the baby. She hasn't been there 12 months so I guess she doesn't qualify for FMLA. Is there something in the state of MO that would say she gets that or is it just up to the company at this point?
    Terry and Sara, your mothers didn't love you enough? This is exactly what the womens rights movement was about. To allow mothers to not only have a family but join the work force as well. Our finances are in order she would just like to have her job after taking care of our kid. She will more need the recovery time than anything. If nobody had kids b/c they wanted to work then we wouldn't live on. So maybe think about your answers first.

    • ANSWER:
      depends on the business & the state - sorry but some states allow businesses to let you go "without cause"

  35. QUESTION:
    How Would i summarize this article?
    The Court Confronts a Grievous Injury

    For years, the Bush administration has worked with industry to try to water down the public’s protections by preventing states from enforcing rules and regulations tougher than those required by the federal government.

    It has tried to apply this policy of pre-emption to rules issued by a slew of federal agencies and is now asking the Supreme Court to approve its improper ideological stand when it comes to drug safety

    On Monday, the court heard arguments in the case of a Vermont musician who lost her arm after being injected with an anti-nausea drug. There is no doubt that Diana Levine was badly injured by a drug made by Wyeth. The only question is whether the Supreme Court will uphold her right to sue the company over its failure to adequately warn of a drug’s dangers. Or will it buy the arguments of the industry and the Bush administration that companies like Wyeth should be protected from such lawsuits in state courts if the products that caused the injury met federal regulatory standards?

    The administration wants approval by the Food and Drug Administration to be the final word in these cases, not state laws like Vermont’s that often require the manufacturer to meet a higher standard in warning doctors and patients about potential dangers. The court should rule in favor of Ms. Levine.

    Ms. Levine went to a clinic seeking relief for a migraine headache. She received Demerol for her headache and Wyeth’s Phenergan to combat nausea, both administered by injections into the muscle, which is the preferred route of administration. When the headaches persisted, she returned for more treatment.

    This time, the same medicines were administered by an intravenous “push” technique that is known to be risky — using a needle inserted into a vein. A physician’s assistant mistakenly hit an artery, with catastrophic results. Ms. Levine quickly developed gangrene; her hand and lower arm had to be amputated. She sued the physician’s assistant, the supervising physician and the clinic for malpractice and won an out-of-court settlement, as well she should have.

    Then she sued Wyeth for failing to warn the clinicians to use the much safer “IV drip” technique, in which the drug is injected into a stream of liquid flowing from a hanging bag that already has been safely connected to a vein, making it highly unlikely that the drug will reach an artery. A trial court awarded her .7 million, and the Vermont Supreme Court upheld the verdict. Now Wyeth, supported by the Bush administration, has asked the Supreme Court to reverse the verdict on the grounds that Wyeth complied with federal regulatory requirements.

    We do not buy Wyeth’s argument that it did everything it needed to, or could have done, to warn doctors about the dangers involved in the treatment Ms. Levine received. Wyeth did warn of some dangers of the drug treatment, in words approved by the F.D.A., but the state court was well within its rights to conclude that those warnings were insufficient.

    And that is the greater point. When Congress revised the federal law governing the F.D.A. in 2007, drug companies wanted, but did not get, a provision shielding them from this sort of lawsuit. The drug industry and its administration allies now want the court to ignore the absence of express legal language and grant drug companies immunity based on a phony assertion that state lawsuits improperly usurp federal regulatory authority.

    For the court to broadly endorse the concept of “implied pre-emption” in this case would show disrespect for the considered decisions of Congress and could foreclose injury suits involving not only drugs, but also motor vehicles, household products and other things. The ultimate effect would be to undermine consumer safety.

    Far from usurping the F.D.A.’s power, litigation aimed at holding drug companies liable for problems like those in this case complement the agency’s efforts to protect the public. For many years the F.D.A. welcomed state failure-to-warn suits as reinforcing those efforts; two former commissioners, David Kessler and Donald Kennedy, made that point in a brief in the case.

    Only under President Bush did the agency overrule its top staff members and try to pre-empt such suits. We hope this business-friendly Supreme Court will preserve the consumer protection that state tort actions often provide. Otherwise, the incoming president and Congress will need to pass corrective legislation.

    How would I summarize this article? Im not so sure on what its talking about and how I would analyze it. Please help

    • ANSWER:
      This is not a Question, But A Long PROOBAMA proLib Diatribe. Who cares what you think?

  36. QUESTION:
    Why do people come to the United States for health care? When they have the rest of the world to choose from?
    Visitors seeking U.S. health care fret over work
    By Ramit Plushnick-Masti, Associated Press
    GIBSONIA, Pa. — A bright girl with dark curls crowning her face, Matisse Reid has been sick all her life with a rare disorder that prevents her body from absorbing nutrients.

    She nibbles on beet salad for lunch, but Matisse's real meal — fats, nutrients and fluids — come from an intravenous line running from her backpack to a vein in her stomach. After six years of IV feedings, the pressure on her liver is becoming life-threatening and she is running out of usable veins. Often, she is doubled over with chronic pain and vomiting.

    After months of fundraising in their native New Zealand, Wayne and Jodee Reid, Matisse's parents, packed up their family of six and traveled 8,500 miles to Pittsburgh for a multi-organ transplant that could save their 6-year-old daughter's life.

    As they wait for a stomach, bowel and pancreas to become available, the Reids must draw from 0,000 they raised, money they are counting on to carry them through the years it will take Matisse to recover from her operation.

    Like other foreign families in the United States to obtain lifesaving medical care, the Reids are here on tourist visas, which do not allow them to find jobs. Families say that makes it more difficult to sustain themselves on the long journey of saving their children's lives, adding to their anxiety.

    "At the end of the day, we're just parents trying to do what's best for their children," Jodee said as Matisse, who is often in pain, played upstairs in the home they rent in this Pittsburgh suburb.

    The Reids arrived in Pittsburgh in January, expecting to spend about three years here for Matisse's operation and long recovery.

    But with the wait for the transplants expecting to take eight months to a year, they now realize they may have to stay closer to five years — and it's unclear whether the money they raised will be enough. If they spend only ,000 annually — a tight stretch for a family of six — the money will run out in about four years.

    Often, coming to the United States is the only choice for families seeking complicated transplants, leaving people who have always worked dependent on charitable people and organizations. On rare occasions, they are forced to return home.

    "There's no provision whatsoever, even for humanitarian grounds, to allow these people to work," said Bruce Larson, director of the international personnel office at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., which treated about 8,000 foreigners last year at its hospitals, including several hundred children.

    The federal government does not track how many of the millions of people who come here on tourist visas are seeking medical care.

    Working with the Mayo Clinic and St. Jude's Hospital in Memphis, Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., said he plans to sponsor a bill that would grant work permits to parents of children who need more than six months of medical care.

    But it could get hung up in the bitter debate over immigration reform. Cohen wants to attach his bill to the broader reform legislation, which collapsed in the Senate in June.

    "I should hope it would have support. It's logical, it's humane," Cohen said. "I can't imagine anyone thinking this would be a security risk. It's just a humanitarian issue."

    Matisse was born on Christmas Day 2000 with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, a disorder in which the small or large intestines lose their ability to contract and push food, stool and air through the gastrointestinal tract. It affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States and is most common in children and the elderly. The cause is unknown but symptoms include severe bowel problems — from vomiting and diarrhea to chronic pain.

    Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, where Matisse is awaiting the triple transplant, treats fewer than 30 international patients a year.

    Years of lobbying convinced the New Zealand government to cover the .4 million cost of Matisse's planned transplants. Independently, the Reids also raised nearly 0,000 in donations to sustain Matisse and her three siblings — Rachel, 15, Kalani, 9 and Fraanz, 2 — during the years it will take Matisse to recover.

    "It's only the highly motivated or those with some resources to raise money to come to another country, whether it's England, France or the United States, can come," said Dr. George Mazariegos, director of pediatric transplants at Children's Hospital. "Right now the care is very disproportional to the need."

    Intestinal transplants have been done only about 1,300 times since 1989, nearly all in the United States, Mazariegos said.

    A study by a group of doctors in Columbus, Ohio, found that of eight children who underwent such transplants, two died a short while later. Of those who survived, the study found their lifestyles were significantly improved and at least three had normal bowel movements within 18 months.

    For the hundreds of foreigners who come to America every year seeking medical care, the issue of finances is ever present. Sometimes, medical care can take years, putting families in a financial bind.

    According to immigration attorneys, there are two alternatives for foreigners to receive work permits, and both are rarely effective.

    A family can open a small business. However, to ensure the business is viable they must invest at least 0,000. In this case, the owners of the business would have their visa status changed and they would get working papers.

    Getting hired by a research institute, such as a university, can also provide a work visa. However, there are just a few thousand such visas issued annually and they normally expire within days of the lottery. Non-profit research institutes, such as hospitals, do have an unlimited number of work visas that they can issue annually and a foreigner hired by such an institution could get working papers as well.

    Wayne Reid is a carpenter by trade and desperately wants to work — to keep busy and earn money for the family. He said he was offered under-the-table odd jobs but he refuses to do anything that might jeopardize his daughter's treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      Because we have the best system in the world.

  37. QUESTION:
    Bruising after a blood test?
    i recently just got a blood test and this is my second one. the next day after the blood test, i started to see a bruise probably an inch and a half in length just above the area they poked. the nurses at the clinic couldn't find my vein so they poked around 2 times and then sent me to the lab where they found my vein on the very first try. however, i bruised on my last blood test and it was all over my inner elbow and it was huge and nasty. is this normal? and if so (or not), what is it and why is it happening?

    • ANSWER:
      As others have said, this is totally 100% normal. However, it is NOT due to inexperience. You could have someone who has done thousands of blood draws hit your vein on the first try and have it be entirely painless, and you could end up with a bruise the size of Texas!!

      Bruising can happen for a couple of different reasons. It could happen while the needle or IV is in, and you may have weak veins and blood will leak out of the veins and into the surrounding tissue.
      The other reason is when they remove the IV or blood draw needle. If you do not hold pressure on the site for long enough, or if you don't hold pressure at all, blood will still be leaking out of the vein and into surrounding tissue.

      The blood that leaks out of the vein and into the surrounding tissue is what causes the bruise.

      Some people will clot very quickly and require essentially no pressure to be held at the site. Others, especially those who take Coumadin, Plavix, or Aspirin, may require pressure to be held for a while and STILL they may end up with a bruise. Everyone is different, but regardless, it is totally normal.

      If it starts to hurt, put an ice pack on it or take some ibuprofen. Otherwise, treat it like any other bruise!

  38. QUESTION:
    i have a blood draw tomorrow?
    Im 13 and my clinic tried to draw blood from my arm yesterday but my veins are super tiny and they couldnt find it once the needle was in. they tried on both arms. so i went to LabCorp this morning for another try and the lady tried 3 times.
    my mom told me to drink alot of water but even drinking water has made me kinda nauseas.
    what can i do so this wouldnt happen again. anything other than drinking alot of water, any alternatives?

    • ANSWER:
      eat fruit
      orange juice is better lol

  39. QUESTION:
    Whenever I check Blood pressure, it is low.?
    But when I go to a doctor it is invariably high, except with a few. Even when I take my electronic instrument to the doctor's clinic, it shows exhorbitant figures. What an be done? If dosages are increased, the pessure and pulse comed down, very much, when I check.
    Also how many times we should check the B.P? Is there harm on the muscles or veins of the arm if frequent measurements are done?

    • ANSWER:
      First, home blood pressure monitors are notorious for giving falsely high or falsely low readings. If your machine isn't calibrated by the company frequently, the numbers it is giving you are probably incorrect. You should be taking your blood pressure once a day, usually at the same time each day - often when you first wake up, while sitting quietly on the side of the bed. Write this number down. This is probably the most accurate of any blood pressure reading you will get. Take these numbers to your doctor on your next visit and have a discussion with him as to whether he thinks any of these might be accurate, especially when he is finding much higher numbers. If your number are high all the time, you should be on blood pressure medication, be starting an exercise program daily - walking is easiest, watching your salt intake in foods and losing weight - all of which will reduce your blood pressure. You should not be checking your blood pressure over and over.

  40. QUESTION:
    I think a Nurse hit my tendon while drawing blood.?
    Last week i had my blood drawn at a small clinic. The nurse hit my vein and drew several vials of blood successfully and with little to no pain. When she was done she put gauze over the needle that was still in my right arm and pushed down as she pulled the needle out. As she pushed down there was a intense pain and burning feeling and continued as she pulled the needle out. The pain lasted for several minutes after. The pain went a way but i still have what i would call a uncomfortable feeling in that area when i pick something up with that arm. Its very difficult to describe the feeling but it seems to be associated with the tendon because it just feels very weird when I turn my forearm when holding something even a glass of water. There is no constant pain and there was never any bruising. Has anyone ever had or seen this problem? Is it possible she hit a tendon and if so will it heal on its own?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible to hit a tendon while drawing blood. And the technician that did this should not press down until the needle is out of the arm.
      You probably have a deep bruise that you cannot see. It may go away after a month or so. If not, tell the doctor that ordered the lab draw that you think there is a problem.

  41. QUESTION:
    I need to get blood drawn, but my veins are terrible?
    I've been to the clinic twice in effort to get blood drawn. Each time, I've gotten stuck over four times, and no success. This last time, they brought in their best nurse. She stuck me five times, then suggested I go home and try another day. My mom suggested drinking, but I had been drinking all week before that. They use butterfly needles to compensate my tiny veins, but no luck. Each time I go to the hospital, they have to use an ultrasound machine just to find a good vein, then it takes hell to get it. :( Also, my feet are not an option at all. They have majorly poor circulation to the point where they are always purple-ish gray. Is there anything else I can try?
    Eh? Ahaha, no, I meant water. I'm 19, I can't drink! Sorry for the confusion.

    • ANSWER:
      Hydration is important before a blood draw. Another trick is to warm the area with a hot water bottle or some sort of moist heat. You could fill hot water bottle before leaving home and take it with you keeping it on the area that has been the most successful. Make sure you keep your sleeve between you and the bottle so you don't burn yourself. The heat will bring the blood to that area and make your vein more pliable and hopefully make it easier for you.

  42. QUESTION:
    Headache after Heroin? Irony injected straight into the veins...?
    Alright so a few days ago I *cough nothing happened blah blah cough* which resulted in magically having a balloon of H in my pocket. I had just gotten out of a Methadone Clinic (if that's relative), well months ago and so anyway I wanted smack..kinda like that cup of coffee you say "fvck it" to out of nowhere. So I did my thing, since I have "hidden" veins it's a bit harder but I eventually popped em out. That balloon lasted me two days, on the 1st I injected in both arms about 60-66 units each (100 units = 1cc, right?). I was in Heaven. Then I woke up with a horrible headache. I make it a point to never once get a hangover in my life (water before drinking = gold). I had a 2nd concussion the day before (I was released after CT scan was all good) so I wanted a good nights rest but woke up with this.

    2nd day, I gave myself the last of my dope IV through a good, fat vein and injected right due to the blood flowing into the needle. I thought this would get the headache snuffed. I was wrong, today I woke up with the same painful head that feels like the muscles inside my scalp are pulling in all directions. What the Hell?

    Shouldn't it remove pain? - IT IS stronger than Morphine Sulfate and Fentanyl. Is it a rebound headache from neglecting my brown and white opiates for so long? Too much water per powder? Bad batch? Is it even connected?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know the reason why, but it isn't uncommon to get a headache from doing dope. Opiates increase intracranial pressure, but I don't know if that is the reason they can cause headaches. I wouldn't worry about this particular issue.

  43. QUESTION:
    differential diagnosis for hepatomegaly and lymphadenopathy ?
    23 year old man came to my clinic with the chief complaints of abdominal pain and low grade fever . General examination revealed that he was having cervical lymphadenopathy & a sinus in neck which was most probably scrofula .On abdominal examination i found him to have hepatomegaly , a few visible veins above the level of umblicus and ascites .Examination of other systes revealed nothing significant.Differential diagnosis please

    • ANSWER: